Developers and DBAs Collaboration Panel at PASS

About Show #621

How do you get developers and DBAs to collaborate more effectively? Richard moderated a panel discussion at the PASS conference in Seattle with panelists Amy Herold, Angela Henry, Lyndsey Padget and Tim Corey to share their experiences and debate methods and mechanisms that can help. Lots of participation from the audience as well!
 

Amy Herold is currently a Sr. Database Administrator with One Technologies in Dallas, specializing in PowerShell and automation. She is also currently the Director of Programs for the North Texas SQL Server User Group (NTSSUG). She frequently speaks at SQL Saturday and user group events across the United States and has also participated in numerous Women in Technology sessions as a panelist. Amy currently blogs at sqlkitten.com.

Angela is a DBA/BI Developer, living in High Point, NC and loves what she does. She's worked with all versions of SQL Server & worn all the hats that come with dealing with SQL Server throughout the years: developer, administrator, data architect and BI developer. She has her MSCE: Business Intelligence and is a Data Platform MVP. She volunteers with PASS in various capacities, ranging from Program Committee to cleanup at local SQL Saturday events. She is also the chapter leader for the PASS Triad SQL User Group in Greensboro, NC. In her spare time you can probably find her in or at the pool, she's an avid US Masters Swimmer, Coach and Instructor.

Lyndsey Padget is the founder of Longplay Software in Kansas City. As a full stack developer with over 14 years of software and web development experience at both mega-corporations and startups, she enjoys sharing in-depth knowledge on topics such as git & release management, MEAN stack development, microservices & REST, test-driven development, agile & kanban, healthy teams, diversity & inclusion, public speaking, and more. Lyndsey is involved in local organizations that encourage women, young and old, to explore careers in math and science. She believes that the difference between a good software engineer and a great one often has little to do with code.

Tim Corey is a professional software developer for over 20 years. He's a Microsoft MVP in Developer Technologies and a Software Development Teacher who's goal is to make learning software development easier.
 

Show Comments

blog comments powered by Disqus